Lump on dell power supply cable-Yet another Dell AC adapter bites the dust - Dell Community

Samething happened to me. I called tech support, they sent me a new one overnight, and I sent the old one back. Problem is that whenever I pack up my powerbrick, I would hold it by the DC cord the one that plugs into the system as I wrap the cord up. Now, I set the brick on the table while wrapping the cord and try to not let the brick hang by the DC cord. Browse Community.

Lump on dell power supply cable

Lump on dell power supply cable

Lump on dell power supply cable

Lump on dell power supply cable

Dell Laptop Adapter ac 90w WIthout power cable. It would only be a matter of time before those weakened, too. I can only charge the battery with the computer completely shutdown. Dell 65W Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews. A ferrite bead is simply a hollow bead or cylinder made of ferritewhich is a semi-magnetic substance made from iron oxide rust alloyed with other Tight vid black gallery. If you are a seller, Fulfilment by Amazon can help you grow your business. Happy with purchase. Would you like to tell us about a lower price?

Cummy rubber gloves. Have a question?

I did receive a new power cord after Dell Lump on dell power supply cable the complaint from the BBB. Invest ddll a high quality power supply. I Made It! It may be necessary to clamp the enclosure until the glue has del, cured. It is very difficult to connect most Molex connectors improperly, but if you vell determined and strong enough, it can be done. Good luck guys. Some Dell computers are designed to use an odd connector. The easiest way to remove the jacket is to carefully cut around the circumference of the cable with a utility knife then pull the jacket off and discard. Use your soldering iron to desolder the remaining piece of low voltage cable from the power brick. Hopefully I didnt throw it away lol. It's fine if the new unit is a bit longer, as long as it will still fit into your case. Email them to us at explains gizmodo. And more importantly, is Dell going to send me a new power supply cable?

Did you use this instructable in your classroom?

  • As everyone else who has posted a reply to Andrew's message, my cord is splitting right behind and between the log lump and the actuacl connecter shaped like the head of a dinosaur, which is what this cable should become: extinct.
  • When a PC power supply dies or begins to wear out, it must be replaced.
  • You have some sense of what the wires going to and from your computer do.
  • After years of being thrown in travel bags, tripped over, and quite literally dragged through the dirt many laptop power cords succumb to the abuse and begin to fray.

Thank you for your suggestion. That is exactly what Dell should have done. Instead, Dell has added something more. Something that you won't find inside any adapter you can buy anywhere else. Inside each Dell AC adapter you will find a power supply that is very much like something that you would find at Radio Shack.

But Dell has added something extra, both inside the Dell AC adapters, and inside their laptops. Inside the AC adapter you will find a little "transmitter". I put the word transmitter in quotes, because this transmitter does not send radio signals. Instead, the transmitter sends a digitally-encoded serial message that is superimposed on the DC power being delivered to the PC. Periodically, or perhaps for just a short period of time when a jump in current is detected, a Dell AC adapter's transmitter will send a digital signal down the DC power cord into the laptop.

It can actually do this at the same time that it is providing DC voltage to run the laptop. Pretty cool, huh? Inside the laptop you will find a little "receiver" built into the motherboard. The receiver detects the digital message being sent by the AC adapter, and sets an electronic flag that the PC can read. The laptop's BIOS a low-level program that runs before the operating system is even loaded into memory tells the laptop to read the electronic flag, and if it doesn't see that the flag is set, the laptop will turn off charging current to the batteries.

This is a "clever" way for Dell to make sure that everyone at least everyone who wants their laptop's batteries to get charged will always purchase a genuine Dell AC adapter instead of a quality adapter from the local Radio Shack store. Unfortunately, the little transmitters inside the adapters are of a very fragile design, and they fail regularly and without warning. The DC power from the adapters generally continues as before, and powers the laptop just fine. We have no choice: only Dell adapters work with Dell laptops at least the Inspiron and You are correct that you need to be careful when trying to substitute a power supply from some other manufacturer to replace the original AC adapter that comes with your laptop.

If the replacement adapter delivers AC instead of DC, or provides an incorrect voltage level, or you hook it up backwards oh no! Definitely not fun. I have had the opportunity to work as an electrical engineer at several companies that design and build lithium battery-powered equipment. I can tell you that you want to be very careful how you charge lithium batteries.

If you do it wrong, the batteries can actually explode, causing serious burns and general mayhem. Dell might have you believe that there are safety reasons why Dell must ensure that only genuine Dell AC adapters are used with their laptops, since an "inferior" adapter could cause a nasty lithium-fueled explosion. But Dell would not be very honest if they told you that. The fact is that the power delivered by the AC adapter does not go into the lithium batteries directly.

There is some rather sophisticated electronic circuitry inside Dell laptops, and inside all devices that charge lithium batteries. That electronic circuitry limits the charging voltage, and provides a highly-regulated charging current to the lithium batteries, while monitoring the batteries' temperature and voltage level.

All this is necessary to ensure that the lithium batteries don't overheat, which would shorten their lifetimes, and could result in fire.

But all that sophisticated electronic circuitry has another bonus: it means that you and your lithium batteries are protected from harm even if the voltage delivered by the external AC adapter is not exactly just right. In other words, even if your genuine Dell AC adapter or any other brand of adapter goes berserk and starts delivering an incorrect voltage to your laptop, you are still protected from harm.

OK, Dell made the choice to design their laptops this way, so what can be done now? With just a little change to the BIOS, our laptops could totally ignore that little electronic flag that gets set or doesn't when genuine Dell adapters are used. Then our computers would once again work, and even charge the batteries of our Inspiron laptops. Best of all, Dell could provide this to us at virtually no charge. It would be just a simple download of a BIOS upgrade.

The benefit to Dell customers is obvious. But what is in this for Dell? The answer: happy customers. Happy customers are loyal customers who will return to Dell to purchase computers in the future.

Sure, Dell might lose some AC adapter sales, but that loyal customer base would keep coming back for more of that reliable Dell equipment. Dell, please wake up, and listen to your customers. Please fix this problem that was your own creation. Thank you for your post. However, I hate it when my irrational arguments are shot down by clear reasoning. You are clearly correct that, at least when the laptop is shut down, the BIOS is not involved in selecting whether the batteries are charged or not.

And if BIOS isn't involved when the laptop is shut down, it also might not be involved when the laptop is powered up. BIOS may only be a messenger, telling the user that the AC adapter is not recognized, and might not have any ability to override the hardware's rejection of a non-Dell adapter. So maybe there is no cheap fix for my problem. I hope one of them makes a replacement for Dell's Inspiron AC adapters Now to your problem.

It sounds like it might be a problem internal to your laptop. It could be related to the temperature of a single component inside the power control circuitry inside the laptop; a component that heats up when current from the AC adpter flows through it. A low current, sufficient to charge the battery say, may not heat the component sufficiently to cause it to fail.

A higher current, such as when you are running the laptop from AC even in standby mode , might be enough to cause the component to experience a "soft" failure, from which it recovers only once it cools.

The ambient temperature inside the laptop might not be an accurate measure of the local temperature of a small over-heating component. I've seen this type of failure in other non-PC products before.

I suspect that the simplest and cheapest way to determine with certainty whether the problem is within your laptop will be to try a different AC adapter. It seems to be the solution to everything. Your story is interesting. It would appear that there might be a mechanical element to the Dell power adapter failures.

I find your story even more interesting because my most recent experience with having a Dell adapter fail was after I had traveled to Europe with it. I had just arrived in Sweden, plugged the adapter into the wall socket, and voila, the battery that I was relying on for the trip home would not charge. I had assumed that this experience was just a matter of unlucky timing.

So much for my comment about "determining with certainty. I find it difficult to convince myself that there is a mechanical aspect to these failures, so I think the chances are good that your replacement adapter works Failing that, I don't know what else you can do other than throw yourself at the mercy of the Dell Customer Service Department.

I 've never heard of anyone's battery charging problems being solved by a BIOS update Browse Community. Turn on suggestions. Auto-suggest helps you quickly narrow down your search results by suggesting possible matches as you type.

Showing results for. Search instead for. Did you mean:. GrumpyCustomer 2 Bronze. Yet another Dell AC adapter bites the dust.

In January I purchased a replacement Dell PAD AC power adapter because my previous genuine Dell adapter still worked, but its little "brain" that communicated with my Dell Inspiron had suffered an aneurism. I see there being three possible solutions to this problem. Here they are in order of preference from best to worst:. Does Dell provide a compatible power supply with a more robust "brain" design, so that if I purchase it, I won't have to purchase a replacement every year?

I can try to return the failed AC adapter and get an identical replacement that will likely fail on me, again, at the most inopportune time. I learned on my previous experience with this problem that Dell Service doesn't have a clue, and will insist that I replace the battery and motherboard before acknowledging that the AC adapter might be the problem.

So I'm coming to this forum first this time. All forum topics Previous Topic Next Topic. RobertCrabtree 1 Copper. Re: Yet another Dell AC adapter bites the dust. I think I have a solution, but you need to understand a little bit about electricty. Look on your adapter.

It will show a diagram that shows the polarity of your dc adapter plug. You need an adapter that matches those characteristics. I know that some HP dc adapters have similar characteristics. I also know that Radio Shack often makes something called a multi dc adapter power supply. Unless there is a different waveform on the Dell dc adapter, then most dc adapters, it should pose no problems.

Hi Robert, Thank you for your suggestion. Hi Grumpy and others,. I'm confused. I suppose you can always charge your battery with the computer shutdown.

I would very much like to receive a reply to this post by a Dell employee in Customer Services as I am a very disgruntled cusomter. Power supplies contain capacitors which can hold dangerous charges for a few minutes. I bough a new one from UKbatteryfast. Tips If you suspect that your power supply is dying, replace it. Nothing will happen if the cord is damaged. Place the power brick into the bottom of its plastic enclosure.

Lump on dell power supply cable

Lump on dell power supply cable

Lump on dell power supply cable

Lump on dell power supply cable

Lump on dell power supply cable. Вы находитесь здесь

Now for the disclaimer Throughout the remainder of this repair we will be exposed to circuitry that poses a shock risk. DO NOT touch components or their leads unless you are absolutely sure you understand what you are handling. This is a simple repair that does NOT require even a moderate electronics knowledge you only need to be able to solder. Never try to repair a power supply that is in service or connected to any source i.

Proceed at your own risk. Lets continue by unplugging the high voltage cable from the power brick if your power supply allows for this , and by making a single cut through the low voltage cable near the fraying cord. Ensure the fraying portion of the low voltage cable is left attached to the power brick so we can remove it.

We will need them later. Depending on the manufacturer power bricks are held closed in a variety of ways. Some have screws, some are glued, some have locking tabs, and some are even welded. Use your discretion as far as how to open your power brick, but the majority I have encountered were either glued or welded. To open a glued or welded power brick, begin by securing it in a vise or with a clamp. Now, using a sharp utility knife make repeated cuts along the seam until you have cut through the outer plastic shell.

It's important to stop cutting as soon as you are through the plastic so as to not damage the electronics. Take your time. Patience pays off big on this step. I typically spend at least 15 minutes carefully cutting through the entire seam.

I focus on one side of the brick at a time. Also, I have never had to cut around the low voltage cable or the high voltage cable connector. Just stick to cutting the long, horizontal seam on all 4 sides. Now that you have cut through the entire seam, use a flat screwdriver to pry off the top half of the plastic enclosure from the power brick. If you were patient and took your time cutting this step should be easy. With the top removed, separate the bottom of the plastic enclosure from the power brick.

Set the entire plastic enclosure to the side for later. You should be left with a bare power brick. Use your soldering iron to desolder the remaining piece of low voltage cable from the power brick. There should be 2 connections to desolder. Remove them 1 at a time and be sure to note which color wire goes where.

For this example the connections are circled in yellow. Be careful to not touch anything else! If you are particularly driven you can attempt to salvage the strain relief from the piece of low voltage cable we just removed by carefully cutting along its long axis with a utility knife.

If you do reclaim it, don't forget to install it on the good low voltage cable before closing the plastic power brick housing. Find the good section of low voltage cable that we set aside in an earlier step and strip about 1" of the cable jacket from the inner conductors. The easiest way to remove the jacket is to carefully cut around the circumference of the cable with a utility knife then pull the jacket off and discard. It's likely around 16 AWG wire. For this low voltage cable there is only 1 insulated conductor.

Finally we can solder the good section of low voltage cable back into its contacts on the power brick. Be sure to connect the correct wire from the cable to the correct pad on the power brick. Place the power brick into the bottom of its plastic enclosure. Apply a bead of super glue around the entire seam that we previously cut apart, and firmly seat the top half of the plastic enclosure in place over the power brick.

It may be necessary to clamp the enclosure until the glue has fully cured. Whether you salvaged the factory strain relief or not use a hot glue gun and a little creativity to fashion some strain relief of your own! Generally speaking, the beefier the better, but make sure your masterpiece is securely anchored to the power brick enclosure. If you removed your high voltage cable, reattach it now and plug it into the wall outlet.

Use your multimeter to check the voltage of the concentric power plug at the end of the low voltage cable. You should get a reading near the nominal voltage rating of your Power Brick. For this example the nominal rating was 19V. To find your nominal voltage it should be listed in the fine print on the back of your power brick's plastic enclosure. Congratulations, it's ready to use! You have successfully rescued the world from unnecessary electronic waste, and saved yourself a few bucks along the way!

This was a great DIY tutorial. Thank you. Reply 4 years ago on Introduction. Its pretty dangerous. Did it work for you afterward? I expect it did. My hp power didn't work before and i didn't repire it. I bough a new one from UKbatteryfast. It is a great source for OEM chargers if you can find them. As I was the originiator of this whole shebang, I thought i'd let you know what's happened with me.

I thought about speaking to UL but I wasn't sure what they could do other than moan to Dell as the Licence the power adapter has is automatically granted. After several months of trying, I spoke to a head of some department although I forget which and he basically said it was my fault, but because we had THREE laptops with the exact same problem they agreed to replace them. They appeared about 2 months later figures but i've had about e-mails on this subject due to this messageboard form people experiencing the same problem.

As far as I'm concerned it's a disgusting design flawe and dell should recall every single adapter of this type and ideally not use such a shoddy connector which cannot be bought from any spare parts store. Ideally they should use a standard connector like almost every other manufacturer does.

My Inspiron has been one of the worst purchases I've ever made with regards to computers. I've had the LCD replaced about 4 times under warranty but each time they said there were no problems and I don't believe they actually did anything. They've lost e-mails and all knowledge when it's come to picking up my laptop several times. They even lost it once! On the final time they eventaully did replace the LCD.

The Hard Disk Drive died once and it took me 2 weeks to get that replaced. That happened one day before warranty expired so I was v angry there. Since the Warranty expired the Mouse button just broke After that the Display Hinge simply snapped! The metal when I took it apart was very weak and useless really. Funnily enough, the same thing happened on my dad's Inspiron which is only a month older I've had enough of speaking to people in India at extortianate rates.

I'm paying their wages in my phone bill so the least they could do is speak in an accent I can understand without having to ask them to repeat everything several thousand times, then they treat you like you are stupid.

It really irritated me one time when my LCD had a big green smudge in it and I rang them 1 week after it came back to me for the same problem and theey told me to basically start playing with the Display Matrix cable, I asked if I'd be covered by my warranty if something went wrong as they had just told me to do this, and they told me no.

I would very much like to receive a reply to this post by a Dell employee in Customer Services as I am a very disgruntled cusomter. In the last 3 years we've bought 4 laptops, and 3 desktops If they can't get it right, they shouldn't be selling laptops and making it so hard to get the parts.

At least companies like Compaq make their parts readily available and a complete parts list for everything, and when you ring them to buy parts you're not paying a premium rate number because its a FREE phone number, AND they are based in the same country as you. Browse Community. Turn on suggestions.

Auto-suggest helps you quickly narrow down your search results by suggesting possible matches as you type. Showing results for. Search instead for. Did you mean:. Broken connector. Please post here if you have the same problem. All forum topics Previous Topic Next Topic. I have replaced the cord twice in the year, finally, the pin inside the connector broke and the system can not start without battery no electricity when power adapter was inserted.

Called and was told the only solution is to replace the motherboard. Have to throw the computer away. Dell quality really bad.

AC Adapter Cord Fraying - Dell Community

Samething happened to me. I called tech support, they sent me a new one overnight, and I sent the old one back. Problem is that whenever I pack up my powerbrick, I would hold it by the DC cord the one that plugs into the system as I wrap the cord up. Now, I set the brick on the table while wrapping the cord and try to not let the brick hang by the DC cord. Browse Community. Turn on suggestions. Auto-suggest helps you quickly narrow down your search results by suggesting possible matches as you type.

Showing results for. Search instead for. Did you mean:. AC Adapter Cord Fraying. I use it daily and excessively The cord that is physically attached to the brick and plugs into the system started to separate from the brick about three months ago.

As of this week, it has completely come free of the brick and is now a mass of exposed wires. Obviously, this isn't a good thing. I'm submitting a Technical Support issue, but was curious if this is a common failure of the power adapter. Replacing it with another unit that will separate and fray in a few months does not sound like a long term solution. Are there compatable adapters that are a big more rugged and perhaps smaller and lighter that are third-party options?

All forum topics Previous Topic Next Topic. I am on my 4th Inspiron and have never seen that happen. I suspect you got a lemon and the replacement DELL sends should hold up better.

We're on our 4th Dell Laptop. We have never seen your problem ever on our power adapters. The one thing that we suspect might be happening is that the "Brick" may be suspended from the power plug. In that case, the scenario as you describe maybe the reason the cord is separating or fraying. Use velcro strips to attach "brick" to desk or elsewhere to support its weight. Today, my AC adapter stopped working. It fell apart in the same exact place as you've described. This is the second time this has happened in 9 months.

I have had this Inspiron since March The first time Dell Warranty took care of it for me by sending me a brand new AC adapter. Because I use my laptop for home and office - all day, I needed to borrow my colleague's power charger today to get work done today. The ironic thing: His power cord the hard-wire coming out of the brick is frayed as well - and being held together with electrical tape! At least in my office, this is a very common issue.

I do not suspend or let the brick hang. The bottom line is that these power adapters are not durable enough to handle being transported daily. A friend of mine who has the Inspiron M has an AC adapter that is more conducive to travel comes with a strap to neatly hold cords. I have looked into 3rd party AC devices iGo, etc , but their tip replacements are not compatible with the Inspiron - only the Latitude. If you've found a solution, please share.

One more thing to add about the poor workmanship of the Inspiron are the rubber feet pads - I've glued and re-glued those stupid things on so many times that I've decided to just rip them all off. Yet, another example of poor workmanship on the detail work. ElectricalEngin 2 Bronze. I have that same problem too. I wondered if it would lead to serious problems later on. Honestly, the rubber holding the cord in place isn't that great.

I wish it wasn't so heavy either! You could build houses with the ones that come with the Yes, I think it would lead to some future problems. It would only be a matter of time before those weakened, too. Disregard the few posts that say this is a "lemon" problem or a fluke. I'm in an academic environment with many other heavy Dell users. It's a manufacturing defect in the sense that Dell chose a poor functional design and brittle materials.

Dell also considers it normal usage. No warranty coverage. I believe the unit is not made by Dell, but by LiteOn. Dell Support Resources. Related Topics. Frayed cords on my AC power adapter.

Lump on dell power supply cable

Lump on dell power supply cable