How to make a paper model-How to Make a Paper Model From Scratch.: 6 Steps (with Pictures)

Make This with Us! Chipboard: Chipboard can be found in cereal boxes, or the backing to a pad of writing paper. Chipboard is easy to score and cut with a hobby knife. Chipboard comes in various thickness. Medium , or.

How to make a paper model

How to make a paper model

Reply 10 years ago on Introduction. Using other tools that capture rendered 3D models and textures are often the only way to obtain them. Build time How to make a paper model estimated at 1 to 2 hours. A Fixative such as Krylon Matte Overspray offers smudge protection, and also protects from eventual fade that inkjet ink can be subject to from UV light. Save your design. Print modeel rafter material for your roof, see the rafters on the trackside shed building. Shin Tanaka - Graphic artist who has an amazing line of paper toys. I only use my hand, pencil,ruler to make templates Building your first Model Building - In the Cum all over face Side Shed shown above each side of the model was printed on a single piece of paper.

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Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. How to release your sick imagination onto the public using Tenchi sasami fuck but paper and our friend the internets Get started today. To make an origami house you need just one sheet of origami or regular paper, scissors, and a marker or pen. This may be considered a broad category that contains origami and card modeling. Reply 6 years ago on How to make a paper model. The idea is to fold it up and cut it into a square. You should be left with two creases creating a plus sign through your paper. If these scare the bejeebies out of ye or your 'rents wont let you, you could always fall back on the age old standby, scissors. I will be making the Berreta 92fs, but most guns are rather similar in building.

How to release your sick imagination onto the public using nothing but paper and our friend the internets

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  • Paper models , also called card models or papercraft , are models constructed mainly from sheets of heavy paper , paperboard , card stock , or foam.
  • Few science fair projects are as timeless as a planet model, and for good reason.
  • In this instructable, I am going to show you guys how to make a paper model gun!
  • How to release your sick imagination onto the public using nothing but paper and our friend the internets

Make This with Us! Chipboard: Chipboard can be found in cereal boxes, or the backing to a pad of writing paper. Chipboard is easy to score and cut with a hobby knife. Chipboard comes in various thickness. Medium , or. Thick chipboard,. A single pass of a hobby knife with medium pressure makes a score mark so the chipboard is easily bent.

Metal Ruler: Metal rulers are preferable for use when cutting chipboard or trimming paper Paper Glue: Use a good quality paper glue such as Sobo available in Craft stores or Aileen's Tacky Glue. Spread the glue on the side of the buildings as opposed to putting glue on the paper. Use a small scrap piece of chipboard to get a thin coat of glue.

Too much glue can cause your paper to wrinkle! Photo-Matte Inkjet Paper: Photo matte Inkjet paper is a bit thicker than standard paper and has great print quality to show off the great detail printed from the Model Builder program.

You can find Matte Photo paper at some grocery stores, they call it "presentation paper" Printer We always print on an inkjet printer. One modeling approach we have used on some buildings is to use separate printed output for the walls, doors, windows, and trim.

This approach results in a more 3 dimensional appearance, see Figure. Also in this approach specific components that look good printed on a glossy photo paper, such as the doors and windows were added.

Pastel Chalk You may have a seam where the paper ends at the corners of models. The seam is typically white, and can be quite noticeable. A good method of hiding the seam is to rub on a little pastel chalk that is close to the model's brick or siding color. Craft stores have a good selection of pastels. Small Bar Clamps When you are gluing up the chipboard, adding the floor and gluing on the roof, these come in handy.

Spray a coat on your model when you are done building. In the Track Side Shed shown above each side of the model was printed on a single piece of paper. You can print a model with all of the sides printed on a single sheet of paper, as shown in the Service Station. We have found that extra care is needed in this approach to locate windows and doors, and to bend the corners in exactly the right location. In the Service Station the building walls were chosen from one of the "Cement-Stucco" patterns.

A brick pattern was chosen for the foundation. One of the trim patterns was selected for the upper brick trim. The roof was printed with the terra-cotta roof pattern. Small strips of the terra-cotta pattern were used on the ridgelines of the roof. A stone pattern was printed for the building base and glued to thick chipboard.

The pillars were made from stucco printed matte photo paper that was folded. Small building components such as these pillars are easier constructed from paper. We cut holes into the based to keep the pillars secure.

The description below guides you through the modeling approach used in the small shed. Build time is estimated at 1 to 2 hours. This is a good building to start with if you have not created a chipboard model before. The service station has more components and takes about 2 to 3 hours to complete. Step 1 Print the plan in your selected scale After choosing "Building Plans" from the "Other" Category drop down, select a Model Building Plan from the six available plans, and click on the Design Screen drop the plan and view it.

Since you selected a scale as you entered Model Builder the plan will be ready to use without resizing or adjustment. In larger scales the complete building plan will not fit a single page. See more information about moving Building Plans and resizing plans in the Manual. Step 2 Trace the printed building plan onto a stiff material such as chipboard or pulp-board.

Cut out your chosen material, and score on the dashed lines. See Figure 1. Figure 1 Fold the chipboard at scored corners and tape or glue where the material meets. Step 3 Create a bottom for the model out of cardstock To make the bottom, hold the corner of a piece of cardstock below the model. Take a pencil and trace the bottom cardstock from the inside, see figure2 Cut out the bottom and glue it to the inside of the Model, see figure3.

The bottom will serve 2 purposes: squaring up the corners and providing rigidity. If you want to access to the inside of your building, cut a hole in the chipboard base first. Step 4 Make a Chipboard Roof The roof for each of the sample model buildings is a rectangular piece of chipboard, scored at the roof ridgeline. Set the roof aside for later assembly. You can choose to print the Building Plan Superimposed onto the Materials when you are done or Print the Building without the plan on it.

See the manual for more information on your choices for working with building plans. Add a background building material to the screen, choose from siding, bricks, stucco, stone, or wood from the "Materials" Palette and paint or crop the material to a size appropriate for the building side.

We like to make our materials a little oversize. It's easy to trim excess material, but hard to add extra material if you fall short!

Save your design. Some materials such as metal can be used as a single piece to span both sides of the roof. Some roofs look better with a separate roof piece printed for a roof cap.

See the small service station figure above. Print some rafter material for your roof, see the rafters on the trackside shed building. This adds a nice detail to your roof, especially if your roof overhangs the front and back of your building by a good amount. Step 6 Glue your printed design to the chipboard building There are several approaches to adhering your print output to your chipboard model.

The following is the technique we prefer: Cut the printed building sides oversize, as we will be trimming off extra paper with a hobby knife. You may find it easier to trim the top edge before gluing as the roofline makes it more difficult to trim this area later.

Spread paper glue on one side of the chipboard building using a scrap piece of chipboard. Try to get a nice even thin coat. Place your printed design onto the glue, check to make sure your design is straight. Allow to dry. Trim the excess paper with a sharp hobby knife, see figure 4. This trimmed edge will meet up with the trimmed edge of the adjacent side to make a degree corner.

Figure 4 You may see the white edge of the paper at the building corners. This will be fixed in Step 7. If you are using 1 printed image for both sides of the roof, bend the chipboard roof to an angle a little beyond the angle you need, stick on your roof paper, and hold it in place until dry with a small clamp. If you are gluing on 2 separate pieces of paper, cut the top edges at the top of a shingle row.

Bend the chipboard to the desired roof angle before gluing. When gluing slide the 2 nd paper side up to the 1 st paper side until they meet.

For the service station we added a roof ridge cap for added detail. A ridge cap would be more difficult to add to a tighter angled roof. Step 7 Chalk visible paper edges At the corners of the building walls and roof ridgelines, the white edges of the paper may be noticeable.

These areas can be easily touched up with pastel chalk. Pick a pastel color that is similar to the brick or siding color of your building. Scrape off any coating the chalk may have and rub sparingly across the building corners. See figure 5. For roofs, this may be easier to accomplish after the roof is in place. See step 8. Figure 5. Step 8 Fasten the roof Use glue to fasten the roof to your building and hold the roof in place with small clamps or rubber bands until dry.

Step 9 - Optional: Spray Fixative to protect your model from eventual fading. A Fixative such as Krylon Matte Overspray offers smudge protection, and also protects from eventual fade that inkjet ink can be subject to from UV light.

Now you are ready to install your new building in your layout! Menu Cart 0. Building your first Model Building - In the Track Side Shed shown above each side of the model was printed on a single piece of paper. See more information about moving Building Plans and resizing plans in the Manual Step 2 Trace the printed building plan onto a stiff material such as chipboard or pulp-board. Figure 2 Step 3 Create a bottom for the model out of cardstock To make the bottom, hold the corner of a piece of cardstock below the model.

Figure 3 Step 4 Make a Chipboard Roof The roof for each of the sample model buildings is a rectangular piece of chipboard, scored at the roof ridgeline. For this tutorial we will be printing each side of the building separately. Figure 5 Step 8 Fasten the roof Use glue to fasten the roof to your building and hold the roof in place with small clamps or rubber bands until dry Step 9 - Optional: Spray Fixative to protect your model from eventual fading.

Set up the house. Reattach the styrofoam halves with glue. You'll follow the same process of wetting the paper to make the roof. These will be your walls. Various methods of extracting the model exist, including using a model viewer and exporting it into a workable file type, or capturing the model from the emulation directly. The methods of capturing the model is often unique to the subject and the tools available. Reply Upvote.

How to make a paper model

How to make a paper model

How to make a paper model. Step 1: What Will You Need?

This article has over , views, and 17 testimonials from our readers, earning it our reader-approved status. Learn more Method 1. Decide which planet to make. This will help you determine how large to make your planet. While this isn't too important if you're only making one, if you decide to make a whole solar system of planets, you may want to make them somewhat to scale.

For example, you'd want to make Mars or Mercury much smaller than Saturn or Jupiter. Blow up a balloon. Don't blow the balloon up too much, or it will become oval in shape. Try to add just enough air to make it circular, while making it as large or small as you'd like. Place the balloon tied-end down in a bowl.

This will hold it still and make it easier to apply the papier mache. Make your adhesive. You can use either glue and water, raw flour and water, or flour and water that's been cooked.

There are different advantages to each: the glue and water is easy to mix up, the raw flour and water paste is stronger, and the boiled flour and water paste dries clear.

Remember that thicker paste will take longer to dry and that you'll need to let your paper mache balloon dry overnight. It will thicken into a gel as it cools. Shred your papers.

You can use newspapers, brown craft paper, or construction paper. Use whatever you have easy access to and be sure to rip your paper into pieces or strips. Avoid cutting the papers. The straight lines will be visible once the paper mache dries.

The torn edges of your ripped papers will blend in better. Apply your paper to the balloon. Dip the strips or pieces of paper into your paste. Be sure to completely coat the paper with the glue, but slide your fingers over the paper to remove excess paste. Lay the strips or pieces over your entire balloon. Add another layer of strips over your entire balloon.

Use your hands to smooth out any bubbles or bumps on the surface of your balloon, unless you want to give your planet a bumpy texture. Let your papier mache balloon dry. Leave it in a warm place to dry overnight. The paper and paste must be completely dry before you begin painting or decorating your model. If you don't let it dry, it may mold. In some cases, it may take longer to dry. If your balloon has a lot of paste or layers, it may take more time. Try letting it dry a few days.

Pop the balloon. Once your paper mache is dry, pop the balloon using a pin or a thumbtack. Paint your planet. For a simple model, use acrylic to paint your planet with its predominant color. For the Sun, use yellow. For Mercury, use grey. For Venus, use yellowish-white. For Earth, use blue-green. For Mars, use red. For Jupiter, use orange with white striations. For Saturn, use pale yellow. For Uranus, use light blue.

For Neptune, use blue. For Pluto, use light brown. Method 2. Select styrofoam thermocol balls. If you're only doing one planet, make it whatever size you'd like, but if you decide to make an entire solar system, choose different sizes. This will allow you to accurately depict the scale of the planets. For the Sun, use a 5 or 6-inch ball. For Mercury, use a 1-inch ball. For Venus, use a 1. For Earth, use a 1. For Mars, use a 1.

For Jupiter, use a 4-inch ball. For Saturn, use a 3-inch ball. For Uranus, use a 2. For Neptune, use a 2-inch ball. For Pluto, use a 1. Add texture or defining characteristics to your model. If your planet has several colors, go back and dab the other color over the surface. If your planet has rings, attach wire or a styrofoam ring around the planet.

For rings, you can also cut the styrofoam planet model in half horizontally and glue an old cd through the center. Reattach the styrofoam halves with glue. The CD should appear as rings around the planet. You'll want to dab fresh paint over these areas. Prepare dowel rods if you want to make a solar system. If you've made all the planets to scale, take dowel rods and cut them to size.

This will ensure that the planets are the appropriate distance apart. You won't need any dowel rods for the sun, since it will be the center of the system model. For Mercury, use a 2. For Venus, use a 4-inch rod. For Earth, use 5-inch rod.

For Mars, use 6-inch rod. For Jupiter, a 7-inch rod. For Saturn, use an 8-inch rod. For Uranus, use a inch rod. For Neptune, use an For Pluto, use a inch rod. Attach planets to the sun. Using the trimmed dowel rods, stick the rod into the corresponding planet. Then, stick the opposite end of the dowel rod into the sun. Depending on what type of house you want to make, you'll need some different supplies.

However, all of them are simple and easy to acquire. To make an origami house you need just one sheet of origami or regular paper, scissors, and a marker or pen.

Making a paper dollhouse is slightly more complex but still easy enough. You should have 10 to 11 sheets of paper, a pen or pencil, tape, and scissors. If you want to build a paper fairy house you'll need paper, water, a small bowl, a tray or plate. Decide which type of paper house you want to make. An origami paper house will be the smallest, and a paper dollhouse will be the largest.

Determine what you'll be using the paper house for and choose accordingly. Find a clean work area. It's hard to work in clutter and you'll be doing some precise folding and cutting. Find a clean desk to work on.

Method 2. Fold a piece of paper. Grab a regular 8. The idea is to fold it up and cut it into a square. Start by folding the upper left corner of the paper down so that it lines up with the right side of the paper. Give it a crease at the corner. Now fold the bottom rectangle up and give this fold a crease too. Cut the piece of paper into a square. Once you're done folding you can cut along the straight crease line that you just made. You will be left with a square with a diagonal crease running through it.

Create creases in your square. Fold the square in half from the left edge to the right edge. Crease well. Then, unfold the paper. Now fold the square in half from the top edge to the bottom edge. Again, unfold the paper. You should be left with two creases creating a plus sign through your paper. Fold your paper into a smaller square. First, fold the top edge down so that it lines up with the horizontal crease you made in the previous steps. Then, repeat with the bottom edge, folding it up toward the crease.

Now turn the paper over. Do not undo the folds made in the previous step. Once you've done this, fold the left and right edges in. They should line up with the center horizontal crease. Open up your roof. To make the roof shape, open the flaps in the top corners.

Flatten them so that the corners extend out past the straight edges on the bottom. It should look like an equilateral triangle. An equilateral triangle is a triangle in which all three sides are of equal length. Add decorations. Turn the house over and then draw on a door, window, and any other decoration you want. You're done! Method 3. Tape two sheets of paper together. Tape the short sides together. Start by taking two sheets of paper and folding each in half "hamburger style".

Be sure to crease them well. Then, unfold them [4] and tape the sheets together. Be sure that you are taping the edges parallel to the crease you made when you folded them in half like a hamburger. Now set these two pieces aside. This sheet will be referred to as sheet A. Tape two more sheets of paper together. You need to tape the longer side of the papers together. This sheet will be referred to as sheet B. Draw a line on sheet A.

The line should be about 3 inches 7. Now cut along this line. Try to follow the line. This will become the front of your house. Add the door.

Set Sheet A so that the tape line is at the top. At the bottom of the larger sheet of paper, Sheet B, draw a door. You can also draw on some windows, plants, or any other decorations you want at the front of the house. Connect the front of the house and the floor. Use the creased piece of paper as the floor. Tape the bottom of the piece, Sheet B, that you just drew onto the middle of the creased piece of paper, which is Sheet A. Before you tape, make sure that the creases on the floor line up with the sides of front of the house.

If they don't, you can either make a new floor following the steps above, or just re-crease the paper so that is properly aligned. Set up the house. Stand the creased sides of the floor up so that they are aligned with the sides of the front of the house. Tape them to the sides of the front of the house.

Don't worry if the walls of the house are too short, you'll fix this soon. Measure the length of the walls. Measure the excess space on top of your existing walls to find out how much extra space you will need.

Then, cut two pieces of paper to that height. You can also draw or cut windows or other decorations on the walls at this point if you want. Tape the paper you just cut on top of the existing walls. Be sure to also tape it to the front of the house for stability.

Cut out the door. Cut the door so that it is still connected on one side. Then, crease it so that it will swing open and closed as you wish. Draw two large equilateral triangles on a piece of paper. Equilateral triangles will have three sides of the same length.

These will be the sides of your roof. If you want, you can also cut or draw windows on these to act as skylights. Measure the length of the top of your house. Cut out two rectangles that are 4" wide and the length of the top of your house. For a more realistic look, draw lines or roof tiles on each of the rectangles. Tape the rectangles to the triangles. Tape each rectangle to one side of the triangles.

Then, tape the tops of the rectangles together. When you are done, you should have a large 3-D rectangular prism shape. Tape the prisms to the top of your house.

Now you can furnish it with toy doll furniture to give your dolls a beautiful paper home. Method 4.

Best Paper model images in | Paper, Paper models, Paper crafts

Paper models , also called card models or papercraft , are models constructed mainly from sheets of heavy paper , paperboard , card stock , or foam. This may be considered a broad category that contains origami and card modeling. Origami is the process of making a paper model by folding a single paper without using glue or cutting while the variation kirigami does. Card modeling is making scale models from sheets of cardstock on which the parts were printed, usually in full color.

These pieces would be cut out, folded, scored and glued together. Papercraft is the art of combining these model types to build complex creations such as wearable suits of armor, life size characters, and accurate weapon models. Sometimes the model pieces can be punched out. More frequently the printed parts must be cut out.

Edges may be scored to aid folding. The parts are usually glued together with polyvinyl acetate glue "white glue", "PVA". In this kind of modeling the sections are usually pre-painted, so there is no need to paint the model after completion. Some enthusiasts may enhance the model by painting and detailing. Due to the nature of the paper medium, the model may be sealed with varnish or filled with spray foam to last longer.

Some enthusiasts also use paper crafts or perdurable to do life-sized props starting by making the craft, covering it with resin and painting them. Some also use photo paper and laminate them by heat, thus preventing the printed side from color wearing-out, beyond improved realistic effect on certain kinds of models ships, cars, buses, trains, etc.

Paper crafts can be used as references to do props with other materials too. The first paper models appeared in Europe in the 17th Century with the earliest commercial models were appearing in French toy catalogues in The popularity of card modeling boomed during World War II , when paper was one of the few items whose use and production was not heavily regulated.

Micromodels , designed and published in England from were very popular with different models, including architecture , ships, and aircraft. Commercial corporations have recently begun using downloadable paper models for their marketing examples are Yamaha and Canon.

The availability of numerous models on the Internet at little or no cost, which can then be downloaded and printed on inexpensive inkjet printers has caused its popularity again to increase worldwide.

Home printing also allows models to be scaled up or down easily for example, in order to make two models from different authors, in different scales, match each other in size , although the paper weight might need to be adjusted in the same ratio. Inexpensive kits are available from dedicated publishers mostly based in Eastern Europe ; examples include Halinski, JSC Models and Maly Modelarz, a portion of the catalog of which date back to Experienced hobbyists often scratchbuild models, either by first hand drawing or using software such as Adobe Illustrator.

An historical example of highly specialized software is Designer Castles for BBC Micro and Acorn Archimedes platforms, which was developed as a tool for creation of card model castles. The use of 3D models greatly assists in the construction of paper models, with video game models being the most prevalent source.

The video game or source in question will have to be loaded into the computer. Various methods of extracting the model exist, including using a model viewer and exporting it into a workable file type, or capturing the model from the emulation directly. The methods of capturing the model is often unique to the subject and the tools available. Readability of file formats including propriety ones could mean that a model viewer and exporter is unavailable outside of the developer.

Using other tools that capture rendered 3D models and textures are often the only way to obtain them. In this case, the designer may have to arrange the textures and the wire frame model on a 3D program, such as SketchUp , 3DS MAX , Metasequoia , or Blender before exporting it to a papercraft creating program, such as Dunreeb Cutout or Pepakura Designer by Tama software. From there the model is typically refined to give a proper layout and construction tabs that will affect the overall appearance and difficulty in constructing the model.

Because people can create their own patterns, paper models are limited only by their designers' imaginations and ability to manipulate paper into forms. Vehicles of all forms, from cars and cargo trucks to space shuttles are a frequent subject of paper models, some using photo realistic textures from their real-life counterparts for extremely fine details. Architecture models can be very simple and crude forms to very detailed models with thousands of pieces to assemble.

The most prevalent designs are from video games, due to their popularity and ease of producing paper models. On the Web, enthusiasts can find hundreds of models from different designers across a wide range of subjects.

The models include very difficult and ambitious paper projects, such as life-sized and complex creations. Architectural paper models are popular with model railway enthusiasts. Various models are used in tabletop gaming, primarily wargaming. Scale paper models allow for easy production of armies and buildings for use in gaming and that can be scaled up or down readily or produced as desired.

Whether they be three-dimensional models or two-dimensional icons, players are able to personalize and modify the models to bear unique unit designations and insignias for gaming.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For the broader use of paper in art and craft, see Paper craft. For the New Zealand urban area, see Papakura. This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. Retrieved Archived from the original on BBC Acorn User. Redwood Publishing. Decorative arts and handicrafts. Cameo glass Glassware Stained glass Chip work.

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How to make a paper model

How to make a paper model

How to make a paper model